St. Matthew Catholic Secondary School Hot Lunch Orders
 
DUE SEPTEMBER 27th 2018 

All hot lunches are $3.00 each. 
 
If you are completing the form online, please follow the steps below:
 
• Answer all of the questions
• Take a screenshot or a picture of the completed form to remember your order details.
• Click submit
• Place the money into an envelope or baggie with the student’s name clearly marked.
• Money should be handed to their morning (1st period) teacher on the very next day .
• Order are considered completed once Mrs. McDermid has received both the form and the money.
 
Please complete a separate form for each student.
 
• Cash only – No change provided.
 
* In the event of a snow day, the scheduled lunch will be cancelled and the lunch will become a chef’s special for any student that attends on that snow day. No refunds or exchanges will be given.
 
* The Chef’s Surprise is a seasonal lunch that is based on lessons that are happening within the Hospitality classroom.

Laurencrest Youth Services Presents

Comfort Zone (Ages 12-17)

Tips for Students on How to Deal with Back-to-School Anxiety


Image result for back to school anxiety teens

Returning to school in September can be a nerve-wracking experience for some students. To help turn those anxious feelings around try these tips on how to have a worry-free year:

  1. Get to know your anxiety Before you can take steps to reduce your anxiety, it is important to understand the nature of your discomfort. Here are examples of some questions to ask yourself: • What triggers my anxiety? Are there particular situations that make me uncomfortable? Making friends at school? First day of classes? Giving presentations? Speaking with my professors? • What thoughts and predictions contribute to my anxiety? Do I worry what others may think about me? Do I worry that others may view me as stupid, boring or unattractive? Do I worry about being embarrassed or humiliated? • What physical symptoms do I experience in social situations? Do I blush, sweat, shake, or lose my train of thought?
  2. Challenge your anxious thinking Rather than assuming your anxiety-provoking beliefs and predictions are true, treat these thoughts as guesses about how things may be. Is there evidence for or against your anxious thoughts? If you assume that other people will find you incompetent, what evidence do you have for this belief? Is there evidence that people don’t find you incompetent? How might you cope with some people thinking you are not perfect? Is it really important to be liked by everyone, or is that just your anxiety talking? Try to shift the way you think about social situations and look at them the way someone without social anxiety might think about them.
  3. Don’t avoid situations you fear – confront them We all avoid situations that make us nervous. We make excuses to get out of doing things we don’t want to do, and we find subtle ways to protect ourselves in situations that make us uncomfortable (i.e., sitting at the back of the class to avoid being called on by the professor). Unfortunately, avoiding situations and relying on safety behaviours helps keep anxiety alive. One of the most powerful ways to overcome anxiety involves purposely exposing yourself to the situations you fear, over and over again, until you feel more comfortable. Of course, doing this means being prepared to feel uncomfortable during the first few “exposure” practices.

Sabrina Lord

*Full article by Martin Antony of Ryerson University

Tips for Students on How to Deal with Back-to-School Anxiety Image result for back to school anxiety teens Returning to school in September can be a nerve-wracking experience for some students. To help turn those anxious feelings around try these tips on how to have a worry-free year:
  1. Get to know your anxiety Before you can take steps to reduce your anxiety, it is important to understand the nature of your discomfort. Here are examples of some questions to ask yourself: • What triggers my anxiety? Are there particular situations that make me uncomfortable? Making friends at school? First day of classes? Giving presentations? Speaking with my professors? • What thoughts and predictions contribute to my anxiety? Do I worry what others may think about me? Do I worry that others may view me as stupid, boring or unattractive? Do I worry about being embarrassed or humiliated? • What physical symptoms do I experience in social situations? Do I blush, sweat, shake, or lose my train of thought?
  2. Challenge your anxious thinking Rather than assuming your anxiety-provoking beliefs and predictions are true, treat these thoughts as guesses about how things may be. Is there evidence for or against your anxious thoughts? If you assume that other people will find you incompetent, what evidence do you have for this belief? Is there evidence that people don’t find you incompetent? How might you cope with some people thinking you are not perfect? Is it really important to be liked by everyone, or is that just your anxiety talking? Try to shift the way you think about social situations and look at them the way someone without social anxiety might think about them.
  3. Don’t avoid situations you fear – confront them We all avoid situations that make us nervous. We make excuses to get out of doing things we don’t want to do, and we find subtle ways to protect ourselves in situations that make us uncomfortable (i.e., sitting at the back of the class to avoid being called on by the professor). Unfortunately, avoiding situations and relying on safety behaviours helps keep anxiety alive. One of the most powerful ways to overcome anxiety involves purposely exposing yourself to the situations you fear, over and over again, until you feel more comfortable. Of course, doing this means being prepared to feel uncomfortable during the first few “exposure” practices.
Sabrina Lord *Full article by Martin Antony of Ryerson University